Welcome to Lafayette Animal Aid

a Louisiana Cat and Dog Rescue, Adoption Center and Sanctuary

Visit Us:

Email Us: 

Call Us:

 Mail Us:

 

Office hours: 9 am to 3 pm

Adoption Hours: by appointment

LafAnimalAid@yahoo.com (337) 896-1553 

PO Box 298

Carencro, LA 70520

 

Home      News       Cats        Dogs        Want to Help?       Need Help?
Quick Links

SpayNation

Feral Power

SPAY AND NEUTER: WE CAN’T SAY IT ENOUGH

Spay /Neuter your pets = less pet overpopulation = less pets killed.



In Lafayette during the one-year period from November 2005 to November 2006, 5,331 dogs and cats were euthanized at Lafayette Animal Control*. That’s an average of 444 per month, or just over 100 per week. 
These alarming statistics present a good enough reason, all by themselves, for preventing more pet animal births.
Simply put, the widespread failure to spay or neuter dogs results in homelessness, misery, cruelty, and death.

PLEASE help to reduce these numbers by spaying or neutering your pet.

What is SPAYing OR NEUTERing?

Spaying is a general term used to describe the ovariohysterectomy of a female animal. Neutering is a general term used to describe the castration of a male animal. However, neutering is often used in reference to both genders. The surgical procedure, performed by a veterinarian, renders the animal incapable of reproducing.

 


NEED HELP WITH SPAY/NEUTER COSTS?

 

If you’d like to spay or neuter your dog or cat, but cost is a concern for you, we can help. We may be able to provide you with a discount certificate, if you qualify.

Please call (337) 896-1553 or email

lafanimalaid@yahoo.com for more information on this program.

 

Don't qualify for our low cost certificate? Contact SpayNation, Lafayette's new Spay/Neuter Center

 

 

Why should I have my pet neutered?

To Decrease the overpopulation of pets:

Animal shelters, both public and private, are faced with an incredible burden: What to do with the overpopulation of dogs and cats that they cannot find homes for? Estimates across the country indicate that approximately 4-6 million animals will be euthanized at shelters each year, due to the sheer fact that there are not enough willing adopters. Having your pet spayed or neutered ensures that you will not be adding to this tremendous burden.

To gain health and behavioral benefits

 

What are some of the health and behavioral benefits?

 

Male Dog Female Dog Male Cat Female Cat
Prevents certain undesirable sexual behaviors, such as urine marking, humping, male aggression and the urge to roam Eliminates the messiness associated with the heat cycle
Prevents aggressive behavior towards other dogs during heat cycle
Prevents certain undesirable sexual behaviors, such as urine marking, aggression towards other male cats and the urge to roam Eliminates the constant crying and nervous pacing of a female cat in heat
Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate gland, and greatly reduces their risk for perianal tumors Spaying females prior to their first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate gland, and greatly reduces their risk for perianal tumors Spaying females prior to their first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer.

Through neutering, you can help your dog or cat live a happier, healthier, longer life. If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will get along better if they are neutered.

 

Neutering just costs too much!

The cost of neutering your pet should be considered part of the required care for your pet, just like regular vet visits, immunizations and proper food.

The reality is that the cost associated with providing adequate care for just one litter of puppies or kittens is often more than the cost of spaying or neutering. The cost of feeding, worming and first vaccinations for a litter can be upwards of $200 to $300. You must also consider that there could be complications with the birth that require hospitalization or surgery. You will also be faced with finding good homes for the offspring yourself or placing more animals into your local shelter. The cost of the well-being of not just your companion animal, but of future generations, should be considered.

If Cost is a concern to you, we may be able to provide you with a discount certificate, if you qualify.

Please call (337) 896-1553 or email

lafanimalaid@yahoo.com for more information on this program.

 

When can I have this procedure done?

Both procedures can be performed as early as 6 weeks of age.  The American Humane Society, the HSUS Best Friends and the Louisiana ASPCA are strong proponent of "early" neutering since this guarantees that the animals will not be able to breed and populate within a community.

 

Can't I allow my purebred dog to have just one litter?

Mixed breed or purebred -- there just aren’t enough homes. Purebred animals also often end up in shelters. In fact, 25 percent of shelter dogs are purebreds. Responsible purebred breeders have homes for their potential litters before they breed.

I don't even own a pet! Why is this my problem?

All of us are affected by animal overpopulation. Millions of tax dollars are spent annually to shelter and care for stray, abandoned and unwanted pets. Much of that money is spent to euthanize these animals when homes cannot be found. Human health is threatened by the danger of transmittable diseases (including rabies), animal bites and attacks. Property may be damaged and livestock killed when pets roam in search of food. Animal waste is proving to be a serious environment hazard, fouling yards and parks. It is only when all of us assume the responsibility for pet overpopulation that we will see any decrease in the problem.

Have a feral Cat problem? Contact the Wild Cat Foundation

Isn't it wrong to deprive an animal of the natural right to reproduce?

No, it’s wrong to allow these animals to reproduce millions of unwanted offspring that are eventually killed because there aren’t enough responsible homes.

If I find homes for my pet's litters, then I won't contribute to the problem, right?

Wrong. Only a finite number of people want pets. So every home you find for your pet’s offspring takes away a home from a loving animal already at a shelter.

Shouldn't every female pet have at least one litter before being spayed?

No. In fact, your pet will be healthier if she never sexually matures. Her personality will not improve either. She is just as likely to become less social and more aggressive after having a litter, as she is to become calmer and gentler.

Shouldn't children experience the miracle of birth?

No. A more important lesson to teach your children would be responsible pet ownership and concern for life by explaining why their pet should not have babies.

Doesn't neutering alter an animal's personality?

No. Personality changes that may result from neutering are for the better. Not being distracted by the instinctual need to find a mate helps your pet stop roaming and decreases aggressive tendencies. Altered pets are easier to train, because they can focus on training and not on finding a mate

Won't animal shelters take care of the surplus animals?

No. Shelters do their best to place animals in loving homes, but the number of homeless animals far exceeds the number of willing adopters. This leaves many loving and healthy animals in our community that must be euthanized as the only humane solution to this tragic dilemma. Only spaying and neutering can end the overpopulation problem.

Sources

AmericanHumane.org

BestFriends.org

HumaneSociety.org

SpayNation.net

 

______________________________________________________________
Home   -   News   -   Cats   -   Dogs   -   How you can help   -   Need help?  - About LAA
© 2010    Lafayette Animal Aid    -  
PO Box 298, Carencro, LA 70520   -   (337) 896-1553  LafAnimalAid@yahoo.com